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today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
. these are your headlines from around the world. >> with just one week to go before the u.s. economy goes over the fiscal cliff, lawmakers are pointing fingers and playing the blame game. >> mario monti is saying he's available to lead italy. he'll run for office in the upcoming election, but only for a party willing to push his agenda. >>> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi. he tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales, but u.s. shoppers may be running low on holiday spirit. and analysts say that they're spending less, as well. hi, everybody. welcome. merry christmas out there. thank you for joining us here on the show. what we're looking at today, we've got slightly quiet markets ahead of the u.s. open. what we're seeing, though, that all the markets are being called lower across the board stateside. the dow is being called a bit lower, nasdaq is being called a bit lower and th
on, pressure on the price of oil, indisexposeble incomes and henry joins us now. 2013, what does pressure on the price of oil mean? >> downward, i think. i think what we see is some significant nonopec finds. we see falling u.s. demand, rising supply. we see miles driven. there's technology at play. probably the biggest thing that could happen to the auto industry and we can come on to that. that's only a few years out. the message from the futures market that we're get sg oil should be some $10 to $15 lower. if we were to get $10 off the oil price, it broadly equate toes about 1% gdp surprising the western world. it's that time of year where we're pending our thoughts to next year. tangible, economic prices to next year. it will be oil related, a chance, good job with raising the tax threshold in the uk. that means for the first year in five. uk link will be up, not down. and them i also think thattory thing our chancellor did a good job of was she raised taxes by 10 so companies can invest a 215 pounds, not just 200 pounds. >> that's a leverage the other governments have been t
us for more is alan capp, head of credit straebtegyt lloyds. alan, let's get your reaction. the number is going in the right direction. does it make much of a difference? >> right now the equity markets have had a great run. they're looking a bit overstretched. so i'm strul link to see how financial markets will respond positively to this. i think we need something bell to repel us forward. >> what do these numbers translate into in your forecast? >> what these are suggesting to us is manufacturing will not be able to support any growth in the eurozone, so it suggests that the downturn in gdp is likely to continue into fourth quarter, remain in recession and that's obviously a struggle on global growth, as well. >> and we stay in recession in the first quarter? we're now in december. >> there are some signs particularly the china pmi numbers and what we've seen from gdp recently that maybe some of the markets key to u.s. exporters may be showing signs of stabilizing, maybe get to growth. so that might mean moderation in the eurozone might ease in the first quarter. but agai
left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled. the news continues. we will see you back here on monday. >> greta: tonight is america getting weak? vice-president dick cheney slamming president obama's foreign policy. >> our allies no longer trust us or have confidence in us, and our adversaries no longer fear us. the president makes bold statements and bold talk in the last couple of days about developments in syria, but i don't think they care. >> greta: you'll hear more from vice-president cheney in a few minutes, but first, the big threat here at home. >> this isn't a progress report because there's no progress to report. >> tax cuts? not government spending, not irresponsible entitlements. that gets a pass. it will be tax cuts. obama's premise that this country'country'scountry's firse fraudulent and he's fixing it, and they'll be etched in stone. tax cuts. >> the president has given the republicans flexibility to come up with a credible, specific plan. what they offered in return was an empty letter. >> when it comes to fiscal cliff t
work them up into a frenzy about the threats of theocracy. you use the comparison of iran. good lord. we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them, any desire to tyrannize. they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french enlightenment and the british enlightenment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one gave rise to be glorious revolution and eventually the american revolution. the french enlightenment gave rise to the french revolution and a blood bath. this sounds like a ph
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a major settlement with u.s., u.k., and swiss regulators over its role in the libor fixing scandal. with more we'll look at the story with carolyn roth with us on set. i guess we're expecting a settlement, expecting something big. what have we learned today? >> well, first of all, i mean, the market reaction -- ubs up by 1%, can you believe that? what barclays was hit with $450 million fine, i mean, we saw a big hit in barclays' share price. this fine is three time the amount that barclays was fined. $1.5 billion or $1.4 billion swiss>>frank: francs. this is on the libor manipulation charges. ubs must pay swiss reg
with them behind bars. here's what she told us inspired her decision to help these kids. >> i was starting my social work, i got a chance to visit the jail and when i visited the jail first time i felt that how fortunate i am that my parents are working so hard, just for me to get a good education. but there are some other children, just because of their parents, the children are also suffering. so i thought that i should do something. >> fantastic. one word. "cnn newsroom" continues now with the lovely and talented brooke baldwin. >> ashleigh banfield, thank you so much. i'm brooke baldwin. top of the hour, a lot of news to get to on this monday. first, of course, talks over the fiscal cliff. they are going nowhere fast. democrats, they're basically telling republicans, hey, ball's in your court. we'll take you live to the white house for that. also, as the city grieves over an nfl player's tragic breaking point, new debates today about gun control and domestic violence. you'll hear both. but first, the u.s. has long believed syria has a huge stockpile of chemical weapons. now new concern
statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the newspapers, you feel like what else can he say? it's not going to be a day where you'll buy sterling aggressively because most of the news is going to be bad. we're going to have lower growth. potentially
these old coots, it could be used in peace talks and could cure the common cold. unless you think i'm exaggerating, look at how the video ends. >> i have a dumb knee. and then the horse back. ride the cowboy. >> it is video prozac. you are welcome. it is too bad the house of representatives went home on break. i think that is what they need to crack the whole thing wide open. that is simpson style. >> we will see you one hour from now 10:00 p.m. eastern. piers morgan starts right now. >> tonight the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> bob costas, did he cross the line. >> and the most outrageous royal prank over. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers more dpgan ton. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. the royal prank called heard around the world. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively dis
losses this almost four years. u.s. equity futures, though, not too bad so far today. indicated up about 15 points. today is thursday, december 6th, penultimate day before the day of infamy. "squawk box" begins right now. >> welcome to "squawk box." i'm becky quick along with joe kernen. andrew ross sorkin is on vacation this week. onset with us is drew mattis. welcome. thanks for getting up early. >> i'm always up at this time. >> we'll be going through secretary geithner's comments, but first let's get you up to speed on other stories. joe was talking about apple. it has been a rough ten weeks for the most valuable u.s. company. shares tumbling more than 6% yesterday shedding $35 billion of market value. among the reasons cited by analysts, a forecast by an influential research firm suggesting that the iphone and ipad maker is continuing to give up ground it rival the android gadgets. there were also unconfirmed reports that at least one major stock clearing house was raising margin requirements. and then there's the fiscal cliff. analysts citing fears about a hike in capital gains tax
to facebook, like us and ask your question. >> talk of the day, sirius, the company announcing a $2 billion share buy back. and it's a $2 stock, but everybody knows it. mel's gone, howard's still there. >> all right, that does it for us today, again join me on facebook after the show for office hours. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good thursday morning, welcome to "squawk on the street," i'm melissa lee live from the new york stock exchange. negative across the board, looks like we're going to lose about 8.5% on the dow. we're watching for headlines out of an ecd press report. our road map this morning starting with apple, cratering on its biggest decline yesterday on four years, closing just pennies off the lows of the session. the stock continues lower premarket as investors watch the death cross watch. >> a cnbc exclusive, tim geithner says over the cliff is a must. >> bank of england and ecb keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >>
, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school and college, however, he spent most of his time playing drums in a variety of dance. as a rock, he was part of several groups, one of which opened for steppenwolf, among other performers for those old enough
've gotten us into, bring a balanced budget to the table to grow this economy for the long term not the short term. >> there you go. for the long term, not the short term. >> there you go. i'm don lemon. happy new year to you. jooirksz . >>> hello, i'm don lemon and this is cnn's top 10 of 2012. we look at the stories that captured our attention, what we see as the biggest stories of the year around the world, in crime, money, weather and even the biggestscandals and later this hour, those stories chosen by you. anchor of state of the union, candy crowley, with the top ten political stories of 2012. >>> like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. impossible number of possibilities. catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business you didn't build that. >> i like being aable to find service members. >> i'm an american woman who uses contraception. let's start there. >> it's like an etch-a-sketch. you shake it up and we start all over again. >> i'm not going to shut up. it's my turn. >> i think it's called romneysia. >> if i were to coin a term it would be obamaloney. >> the
military. and so when i see raises for the troops it pleases i think all of us. i'm concerned about the afghanistan timeline. i had hoped that it could be expedited. i certainly do commend the iron dome because we saw it work with respect to israel. i question however the drones that may have collateral damage. but i do think it's important that this bill does in fact make a commitment to protecting the women and children of afghanistan, responds to the issues dealing with sexual assault against military personnel and particularly women and it's strong on iran sanctions. . i rise today as well because when we talk about people we talk about men and women in the united states military, we talk about their health. yesterday in the rules committee i raised this point and i raise it again, i'm going to support this bill because i think it will make a leap of faith commitment to finding the cause of triple negative breast cancer. they are usually of a higher grade and size, onset at a younger age, more aggressive, and more likely to metastasize. the survival rate for breast cancer may ha
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
happening in syria with the use of chemical weapons. somebody else has a threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner. you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> stretching and shooting to syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it i
. the only reason they're not going to use it is because somebody else, the u.s., has a similar threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner, you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> i've heard of some stretches, in my time. but stretching from javon belcher and the shooting in syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they caus
that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power play. it's a response to that u.s. act, as you mentioned, a law signed by obama a couple of weeks ago intended to penalize, sanction russian officials connected with this particular custody case and this tax evasion case in russia. >> so matthew, this law would go into effect january 1st. is there any chance that those cases that are pending where the paperwork is finalized and where people are expecting their children, essentially, in a month or two would be allowed to go through? >> well, there is a question mark hanging over those. there are 52 children, according to the kremlin, that are in the middle of this adoption process with u.s. parents. the law, as you say, starts on january the 1st, but it's only a couple of days until then. so unless that can be finalized, my expectation is that that will be put on hold and indeed that's what russian officials are saying, that they don't think this law has been enacted from january the 1st, these children should be allowed to go to the united states. instead there's been a call for r
the sazian session? only one lady to tell us. >> thank you, ross. asian markets ended mix. japan's bourses outperformed the region. despite a slight improvement in november corporate sentiment showed weakness. knee sap finished lower as they planned to recall nearly 50,000 cars in japan. shanghai composite pulled back after yesterday's 3% surge. investors booked profit. property developments seemed to have legs. the hang sent also ended marginally in the red. hsbc came under pressure after reports say it may pay a $1.8 billion fine over the money dering scandal. in australia, strong jobs data failed to boost the market. the asx 200 finished lower by a quarter percent. sensex still in action now trading lower by 0.4%. back to you. >> all right. catch you later. apple had its worst day in four years dragging down the nasdaq. different story for the dow. at one point dow was up more than 100 points. the last time the index closed up triple dinlg et gains, the way back in may two 2. joining us for the first part of the program, nick khar. thanks for joining us. xetra dax up 52 week highs. whic
. >>> good morning. it's tuesday. december 4th. welcome to "morning joe." with us onset, we have msnbc senior political analyst mark haleprin. oh, my god, please stop. just get it off. get it off -- >> pulitzer prize-winning historian jon meacham. "the art of power." >> so you know why i'm doing this. last night, mika goes to madison square garden thinking she's going to see one direction and teenage girls screaming and all that. >> yeah. >> instead, her car gets sidetracked, she winds up at the 92nd street "y," and there are a bunch of screaming girls at the "y." jon meacham's new number one selling book. >> i tried to hand your book out last night at the concert. they weren't interested. >> well, they've probably already got it. >> i've never been to a pop concert. >> did it change your life? >> i have never witnessed such an epic meltdown on the part of thousands and thousands of teenage girls. >> metdown. screaming -- >> screaming. >> other than the group that was at the 92nd street "y" last night that screamed at jon meacham. he was throwing wigs at them. >> jefferson versus one directio
target. talks about the level of u.s. production, rivalries between iran and saudi arabia, and a new secretary general could get heated. >>> italy likely to see a strong uptai uptake thanks to supply reductions before year end. >>> and let's twist again. the fed set to announce a fresh around of bond purchases to match the outgoing twist program at the end of the year. >>> the international community blasts north korea after it successfully launches a long-range rocket, prompting an emergency u.n. security council meeting. >>> all right. a very good morning to you. we are going to be on to opec later. we've got the latest i.a. data out this morning. they're saying global oil demand projected around 90.5 million barrels a day. more than forecast. they say non-opec production bouncing back. an something bit. they're saying opec crude supply inched up in november led by higher output from saudi arabia. >> i think we'll have to call this today the case of the two oil reports. we have the opec report that they put out ahead of the meeting showing different figures from what the iea is say
we have been talking with retiring congressional members. join us later tonight for a sixth-down we recently had with nebraska democratic senator ben nelson. he served two terms and was part of the so-called gang of 14. that is at 8:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. here is a brief look. >> what is your thought about the art of compromise and how much it is now viewed in this city? >> well, you know, is valued to talk about it. everybody back home want people to come back to washington and work together. and then they send people back here who have committed not to work together. that makes it very difficult. if you have in the senate in block of individuals who will not compromise and think of compromise as a for that -- as a four-letter word, which is not, then it becomes difficult to merge ideas and find compromises and accommodations in process or implementation as opposed to your principles. no one is asked to compromise his or her principles when you are talking about compromise. maybe how you go about doing something, not exactly eliminating your view about one thing or another
. >>> it took us three months to establish trust. these guys don't trust each other. they don't even trust each other in their own party. you've got leaders who, people behind them with a shif hoping they can get their job the next go 'round. poor old durbin has people over his back because he voted for this package. and the republicans, boehner's got to go to work and come back, and now there's 70 of them left, the tea party guys. these are guys who went to congress not to limit government but to stop it. so what are you going to do? we've got five democrats, five republicans who range from dick durbin of illinois, great progressive democrat, and coburn of oklahoma, a progressive conservative, and five dems, five republicans, one independent, that's a super majority. and for god's sake, the reason we were so successful is we effectively pissed off everybody in america. >> congratulations, sir. kudos. kudos to you. >> good morning. it's thursday, december 6th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc political analyst, former democratic congressman, harold ford jr. >> mr. professor. >> g
-- please give them a big round of applause. [applause] i want to thank martin for hosting us. i want to thank jeff and gibby for giving me a great tour of the factory. [applause] i've got to say i love coming to factories. >> i love you! >> i love you. so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world -- you've also got all this cool equipment. [laughter] i wanted to try out some of the equipment, but secret service wouldn't let me. [laughter] they said, you're going to drop something on your head, hurt yourself. [laughter] they were worried i'd mess something up. and jeff and gibby may not admit it, but i think they were pretty happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [applause] so it's now safe for you to turn your televisions back on. [laughter] all those scary political ads are off the air. you can answer your phone again -- nobody is calling you in the middle of dinner asking for your support. but, look, i have to admit there's one part of the campaign that i miss, and that is it is
on election 2012. >>> thanks for watching "state of the union." if you missed us, search itunes for state of the union. >>> this is "gps." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i am fareed zakaria i can't. we'll take you around the world today starting with egypt. the nation has erupted. we'll explain what the power struggle between the president and the courts means for the rest of the arab world and the world at large. >>> then china's new leaders. we know their names but who are they and what can we expect from them. is this china's gorbachev or will he take a hard line? >>> finally, the black swan, a best seller some say prediktsd the economic crisis. its author on his fascinating new book. >>> and the next phase of europe's crisis. which nations might find themselves split apart. i'll explain. >>> first, here is my take. arafat's body has been exhumed for investigation. bringing back memories of the unpredictable palestinian leader. the news broke at a time when a conventional wisdom has begun to take hold that the middle east today is much more dangerous,
larger water heaters are within the scope of the energy policy act and are rated using a thermal efficiency or t.e. rating. the problem facing american manufacturers is that under the current rules of the road only the small water heaters are deemed eligible for the energy star program. this is nonsensical. it's an outdated measure. and disqualifies our large american made water heaters from being covered by the energy star ratings, regardless of how advanced or how highly efficient they may be. . the legislation before us today would provide the necessary regulatory and business certainty that is needed by our manufacturers. this legislation has the potential of adding upwards of 1,000 jobs for domestic water heater manufacturers, many of them are in my home state of tennessee, where there are already 3,000 jobs directly involved in the manufacturing of water heaters. i thank the chairman again. i thank mr. aderholt and i also want to commend the gentleman and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the ge
people at a u.s. military base. >> the man blew up a car packed with explosives. police say at least six others were injured. the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack, which came just days after a shooting inside police headquarters. the egyptian president has signed into law a controversial new constitution after official confirmation should a clear majority for the document in a referendum. >> morsi is due to address parliament on saturday after appointing 90 members to the senate. >> critics say the new basic law is islamist and undemocratic. >> the opposition kept up its protest for weeks, but it was not enough. anchor fled on the streets of cairo after official results were announced. critics say the referendum was marred by fraud. am i in my opinion, the revolution continues, and the constitution does not exist. a constitution has to be for everyone, not split the people of egypt. >> everybody knows the results are wrong. i will continue protesting peacefully until our demands are met. >> egypt's election commission says nearly 64% of voters approved the constitution i
appreciate it very much. join us on wednesday. happy holidays. "squawk on the street" starts right now. >> can't wait to see what jason got us here. welcome to "squawk on the street" on this final trading day before christmas. i'm carl, with melissa lee, david faber at the nyse. the new york stock exchange and nasdaq closing at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. the futures, a little bit of weakness here which we'll talk about in a minute, after it comes after a pretty bad day on friday. the european markets closed for the christmas eve holidays. london, paris, spain have each completed shortened sessions in light of the christmas holiday as well. the friday sell-off, only five trading days are left in the year. is the market getting used to the idea that a fiscal cliff solution will not happen before year end? >> only a few hours remain to finish your christmas shopping. but some words of caution for toymakers. are tablets and apps ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a bo
fall. every fall for the book festival called fall for the book, and one of the authors u.s. be at the book festival is brooke stoddard. here is his book, "world in the balance: the perilous months of june-october 1940". brooke stoddard, world war ii started about six months prior to your book. what was happening in europe in june 1940? >> the war had started in september 1939, peter, and germany had overrun poland. hitler's idea at this point was to invade france and knock britain out of the war thereby. with the intent later on to invade the soviet union. he hated communism. this is one thing that was really part of his agenda. he was actually going to invade france in the wintertime, ma in november-december. he had to put that off because -- spent of 1939? >> of 1939. because of the invasion plans fell into the hands of the french and the british, soy put off the invasion until may, and he came up with a new plan. the old plant actually had been similar to world war i. it was going to come through belgium, along the channel coast, and down into paris. but he had to compl
from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and churchill said give it back to them. that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7, i think, the evening. and germans came 81 of the next 82 nights or something like that. and the terror bombing they feared and predicted began. and there was no stopping the bombers. host: how many were killed and how many wounded in great brita britain? guest: i think about 40,000 to 45,000 londoners and 60,000 throughout then the rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million, you extrapolate, that would be at the time almost 2 200,000 americans, unimaginable numbers then and now for us in the united states. host: physically what did winston do during that time, where did he live? how did he relate to london and great bri
? thank you. you do look familiar. where did i see you before? u.s. they good question, did you not? -- you asked a good question, did you not? what is your name again? >> danielle. >> you are old hat here. you do this all of the time. good to see you. have fun. >> have fun, hey. show me what we are doing. what kind of lollipops are these? is this white house honey? do you know these come from bees we keep in the backyard? why? they make fresh honey, and the health the garden grove. -- they help the garden grow. >> this is good. >> did you taste these? this is good. [laughter] these are really good. ?id you put sugar on these ne how do you get it curly? >> they turned out really cute, and it is a good crunch. we should give some of the photographers some of these to see how good they taste. those are so good. healthy, tasty expects. not bad. -- snacks. not bad. ok. now we desperate. i have to figure out what design. -- now we have to decorate. now i have to figure out what design. decisions, decisions. ok. >> this is all edible, ok, guys? >> once you put this on, you can eat this lo
of instability. and all three governments reiterated to us their shared goals -- their share gold -- shared goals. all three indicated to was that the most abusive commanders are now under targeted sanctions and we have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december 29 in uganda and are being mediated with uganda as the chair on the international conference of the great lakes region known as the i c g lra. as the two sides begin substantive con -- talks, the current cease-fire is holding and the parties continue to express commitment to a dialogue. much of the m-23's military success and prowess and would not have been possible without outside support. there's a credit to ballpark -- body of evidence that corroborates the assertions of the u.n. experts that the rwanda government provided significant military and political support to the end-23. while there is evidence of uganda providing support to and- 23, we do not have a body of evidence suggesting that the ugandan government as a policy supported the m-23.
to this story. >> what was amazing to us and what was relevant is the idea that nowhere on american television had a returning soldier returning from war been portrayed. and obviously in very circumstances in the case of our character, but that was something that really interested us but it felt like a good way to dramatize a lot of the questions we answered on "24" in a more knew answer fashion ten years after 9/11. a lot of questions that weren't clear then are even more complex now. what do we have to be afraid of? what's the price of our security? and these are the characters we created to ask those questions. >> and michael, with "the queen" what prompted that? decpwhrit came from another deal. it was a trilogy of films. the deal was a film made for british television about the supposed deal that was made between tony blair and brown before they got into power with the labor party. and the deal, the first one came along at a time when the idea of portraying very prominent public figures certainly within the realm of politics nobody did that unless it was sketch shows, comedy that kind of
language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an exhi business here at the morgan called winston churchill, the power of words. >> what you're looking at here are two images taken by the famous photographer on the 30th of december 1941. winston churchill had just addressed the canadian parliament and he had made his way to the speakers chamber. he was looking for a drink, perhaps also for a cigar. and what he found instead was a photographer waiting for him. and more than that, because the photographer insisted on removing churchill's cigar. and then photographed the ensuing skoul. and it's clear that a few moments later the british prime minister lightened up
, eventually after the last dictator, took his leave of us in nigeria and went to the service of god in the other world. and the next president in nigeria was a former military man also, who had been president, who happened to be from the south. now, remember, when the british left, they left power in the hands of the north. for eight years after that, after the military left, power was in the hands of the southerner. the ruling parties, however, inserted a principle which was just the same as the british left behind. power to remain in the -- the expression at the time was that power was just lent to the south for a few years. it must revert to the north, continue the tradition of the british. this is not very palatable, and unfortunately the president of the nation who took over after the previous one left, was a very sick man, and under the sharad -- let us say for about six months didn't know whether they were being ruled bay ghost or by a living being. it was really -- the drama that went around -- went on around the presidential. so eventually succumbed to nature, and the presi
] -- melissa hart. >> and finally, all of you make such a difference to us. when i think about what makes a successful of the law school, having a diverse, inclusive and collaborative community about standing -- outstanding students, faculty, alumni, and friends, gives us -- the members here come and there are several, very supportive a lawns, professors, this community can come together and really make a difference. and you all matter in so many ways, so want to thank all of you. i can't name you all, but you really help make us successful. now, when justice ginsburg agreed to, she said don't want to give a lecture, but i would like a fireside chat. and i said that would be lovely. and then gave myself a challenging assignment of coming up with a plan for our conversation. it was easy to know where to start, which is what a pioneer you have been, and many people here forget that in the 1950s there were very few women in law school. if you might start by reminding those who remember, and helping to enlighten those who don't, what that was like. >> in those ancient days, i began law school
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